Accounting

ACCO 119 Principles of accounting: 3 credits

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and standards underlying financial accounting systems. Several important concepts will be studied in detail, including: revenue recognition, inventory, long-lived assets, present value, and long term liabilities. The course emphasizes the construction of the basic financial accounting statements – the income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement – as well as their interpretation.

ACCO 206-2: Accounting 2: 3 credits

This course covers the theory and practice of measuring and interpreting financial data for business units, with emphasis on corporations and managerial applications. Basic concepts, principles, and procedures are applied to the following topics: preparation and analysis of financial statements, budgeting, cash flow, cost systems, responsibility accounting, and cost-volume-profit analysis.

CILA 204: Business Law: 1.5 credits

This introduces the ethics and legal framework of business. Emphasis is on contracts, negotiable instruments, Uniform Commercial Code, and the working of the court systems. Upon completion, students should be able to apply ethical issues and laws covered to selected business decision making situations.

COMP 102: Information systems and technology: 2 credits

The course provides the necessary background to enable management information systems personnel to understand tradeoffs in information systems hardware, software, and architecture for effective use in the business environment. Topics covered include information technology planning and strategy, trends in computer hardware and systems software, telecommunications and network management, control and management of information resources, distributed and client-server technologies, and data representation and visualization.

COMP 118: Accounting information system: 1 credit

An introduction to accounting information systems and their roles in the accounting environment.

ECON 104: Principles of economics : 2.5 credits

Microeconomics. Consumer behavior and demand, firm behavior and supply, price determination and market equilibrium under varying industry structure. Applications to labor and financial markets. 2006: Macroeconomics. Measuring aggregate economic activity, macroeconomic problems (such as unemployment and inflation), the monetary system, effects and limitations of monetary and fiscal policies.

ECON 105: History of economic theories: 2 credits

The evolution of major schools of economic thought and the principal developments and debates in economic theory. Discussion begins with Aristotle, but the emphasis is on developments beginning with þmodernþ economics, about 1800, and concluding with an outline of some current trends in economic thought.

ECON 200: Macroeconomics: 3 credits

This course provides thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops your familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics.

ECON 210: Mathematical models in economics: 2 credits

This course provides mathematical economics, strategic analysis, decision theory, stochastic models, mathematical finance and optimization models and also aim to give the knowledge for the modelization of economic and financial problems, for mathematical formalization and tools for the numerical solutions.

ECON200: Microeconomics: 3 credits

The  market system and alternative mechanisms for determining prices and allocating resources. Economic analysis of monopoly, cartels, wage and price controls, pollution, and other contemporary problems. The role of government in promoting economic efficiency.

ECON201: Monetary theory: 2 credits

This course is concerned with the theory and practice of monetary policy in the modern market economy. Topics covered include: the ability of the central bank to regulate the supply of money and credit conditions; factors affecting the demand for money; and the relationship between changes in the money supply and interest rates and the impact of changes in each of these on other economic variable

ECON209: Marketing Management : 2 credits

This course provides an introduction to all aspects of marketing, including strategic marketing planning, marketing research, product planning and development, promotion planning, distribution and pricing. It provides an understanding of the theories of the marketing mix variables, and a practical application in the context of the marketing management cycle processes of research, planning, organization, implementation and control. The latter part of the program examines the process of marketing management in different sectors.

ENGL 105: English: 3 credits

The goal of this curriculum is to set standards for domains of English language learning: social interaction; access to information; presentation; and appreciation of literature and culture, and language. According to this curriculum, by the end, students should be able to: interact effectively in a variety of situations, obtain and make use of information from a variety of sources and media   , present information in an organized manner  , appreciate literature and other cultures and the nature of language.

ENGL105-2: Business English: 2 credits

This course is ideal for students who wish to improve their business language and professional skills in a commercial context in the shortest possible time

MATH 116: Calculus: 2 credits

Intensive course in intermediate algebra and trigonometry. Topics include algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric functions and their graphs.

Comparison of performance on achievement and quality

This course introduces the requisite micro and macroeconomic tools needed to analyze business problems. The emphasis is on establishing a practical link between basic economic concepts and a wide range of contemporary business problems, including economic data analysis for business decision-making, forecasting, demand analysis, pricing, and cost analysis. Topics include market structure, cost and production, international trade and finance, national income determination, and monetary and fiscal policy.

STAT 211: Business statistics : 2.5 credits

This course applies statistical methods in a business context in order to address business related questions and help make evidence based decisions and also learn to apply commonly used statistical methods in business contexts and how to interpret analyses performed by other. Systems covered include manual accounting, computerized accounting, and Internet electronic commerce applications. Emphasis is upon developing students’ abilities to understand the processing of accounting data and the controls that are necessary to assure accuracy and reliability of the data processed by the accounting system.

STAT 202: Statistical theory: 2.5 credits

Distribution theory for statistics of normal samples; exponential statistical models; sufficiency principle; least squares, maximum likelihood, and hypothesis testing, likelihood ratio procedures; the general linear model, the Gauss-Markov theorem, multiple comparisons; contingency tables, chi-square methods, goodness-of-fit; nonparametric and robust methods; decision theory.

Business economics

Primarily an applied microeconomics analysis, although some applied macroeconomic analysis of relevance to the business firm may also be treated. Emphasizes the development of economic tools and concepts that can be used in the firm’s management decision-making process. Builds upon the standard economic analysis of the firm that integrates a company’s revenue, cost, output, and pricing decisions. Marginal and incremental reasoning is stressed as an important decision-making principle.

ACCO 119 Principles of accounting: 2.5 credits

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and standards underlying financial accounting systems. Several important concepts will be studied in detail, including: revenue recognition, inventory, long-lived assets, present value, and long term liabilities. The course emphasizes the construction of the basic financial accounting statements – the income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement – as well as their interpretation.

ACCO 206: Financial Accounting 1: 2 credits

Financial accounting examines accounting concepts, the accounting model, measurement processes, financial statements, financial analysis, the accounting cycle, monetary and fixed assets, inventory, current and long-term liabilities and equity structures of partnerships, proprietorships and corporations.

ACCO 206-2: Accounting 2: 2.5 credits

This course covers the theory and practice of measuring and interpreting financial data for business units, with emphasis on corporations and managerial applications. Basic concepts, principles, and procedures are applied to the following topics: preparation and analysis of financial statements, budgeting, cash flow, cost systems, responsibility accounting, and cost-volume-profit analysis.

ACCO206: Organizational behaviour: 2.5 credits

Provides an overview of topics and concepts in the field of Organizational Behaviour (OB). Emphasis is on developing a theoretical grasp of issues and problems and an understanding of practical implications of various theories of human behaviour at work. Specific topics include leadership, motivation, teamwork, career issues, work roles, job enrichment, employee participation, and work and nonworking integration.

ACCO304: Managerial accounting: 2.5 credits

This course examines the principles, techniques, and uses of accounting in the planning and control of business organizations from a management perspective. Identified are the budgetary process and related performance evaluation techiques, cost-volume-profit relationship, product costing methods, Just-In-Time (JIT) manufacturing, and Activity Based Costing (ABC). Related theory and application will also be reviewed

ACCO400 Financial statement analysis : 1.5 credits

The financial statement analysis course is designed to prepare future managers to effectively analyze, interpret, and evaluate an entity’s financial statements and related information (e.g., attestation reports). The entities subject to analysis will be both private (e.g., owner managed) and public (e.g., where the firm’s securities trade on a stock exchange) and will be drawn from a wide variety of different industries. Tools for interpreting cash flow patterns, for recognizing trends in financial performance (ratio analysis), and for firm valuation will be discussed. The importance for any organization of creating an effective financial reporting strategy will also be examined. The course will also expose students to future trends in financial reporting, both national and international.

and fairness, ethical standards, and moral development. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of their moral responsibilities and obligations as members of the workforce and society.

areas, customs unions and common markets

COMP 102: Information systems and technology: 2 credits

The course provides the necessary background to enable management information systems personnel to understand tradeoffs in information systems hardware, software, and architecture for effective use in the business environment. Topics covered include information technology planning and strategy, trends in computer hardware and systems software, telecommunications and network management, control and management of information resources, distributed and client-server technologies, and data representation and visualization.

ECON 104: Principles of economics : 2.5 credits

Microeconomics. Consumer behavior and demand, firm behavior and supply, price determination and market equilibrium under varying industry structure. Applications to labor and financial markets. 2006: Macroeconomics. Measuring aggregate economic activity, macroeconomic problems (such as unemployment and inflation), the monetary system, effects and limitations of monetary and fiscal policies.

ECON 105: History of economic theories: 2 credits

The evolution of major schools of economic thought and the principal developments and debates in economic theory. Discussion begins with Aristotle, but the emphasis is on developments beginning with þmodernþ economics, about 1800, and concluding with an outline of some current trends in economic thought.

ECON 200 Micro economics 2: 2 credits

To give students a command of the main tools of microeconomic analysis, so that they can undertake advanced work in areas such as industrial economics, public economics, labour economics, environmental economics, international economics and finance; and to show how such microeconomic analysis can be applied in making the transition from theoretical models to empirical/policy models. An introduction to models of information and incentives, including adverse selection, signalling and screening.

ECON 210: Mathematical models in economics: 2 credits

This course provides mathematical economics, strategic analysis, decision theory, stochastic models, mathematical finance and optimization models and also aim to give the knowledge for the modelization of economic and financial problems, for mathematical formalization and tools for the numerical solutions.

ECON 214: Theory of economic analysis: 2 credits

An intermediate-level treatment of the theories of consumer behavior and demand, production and cost, the firm and market organization, and factor markets.This course introduces the requisite micro and macroeconomic tools needed to analyze business problems. The emphasis is on establishing a practical link between basic economic concepts and a wide range of contemporary business problems, including economic data analysis for business decision-making, forecasting, demand analysis, pricing, and cost analysis. Topics include market structure, cost and production, international trade and finance, national income determination, and monetary and fiscal policy.

ECON118: Micro Economics 1: 2 credits

Microeconomics 1 is an introductory course in the theory of markets with relevant applications to business, social and individual issues. The course covers the principles and consequences of ‘rational’ choice by individual economic agents in markets. It also provides introductory analysis of the role of governments in seeking to ensure the efficient operation of markets.

ECON201: Monetary theory: 1.5 credits

This course is concerned with the theory and practice of monetary policy in the modern market economy. Topics covered include: the ability of the central bank to regulate the supply of money and credit conditions; factors affecting the demand for money; and the relationship between changes in the money supply and interest rates and the impact of changes in each of these on other economic variable

ECON209: Marketing Management : 2.5 credits

This course provides an introduction to all aspects of marketing, including strategic marketing planning, marketing research, product planning and development, promotion planning, distribution and pricing. It provides an understanding of the theories of  the marketing mix variables, and a practical application in the context of the marketing management cycle processes of research, planning, organization, implementation and control. The latter part of the program examines the process of marketing management in different sectors .

ECON210: Macro economics 1 : 2 credits

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of aggregate output, employment and economic growth and their relationship to the policy issues of unemployment, inflation and the balance of payments. Other topics include: social accounting and aggregate income and expenditure analysis; macroeconomic models of income determination; consumption and investment functions; the role of money and financial institutions; interactions between goods and money markets in equilibrium and disequilibrium situations

ECON302: Development Economics: 2 credits

Contemporary issues in development economics. Topics include: the way economists’ approaches to leading development issues have evolved to the present and leading development issues, including sources of economic growth, the role of population, human capital and innovation, labour and migration, international trade and foreign aid, and strategies for sustainable economic development.

ECON302: International business communication : 1.5 credits

This course is designed to enhance the student’s understanding of business cultures and cross-cultural communication and develop the student’s cross-cultural analytical skills.

ECON303: Macroeconomics 2 : 2 credits

This course is to discuss shocks, labor markets and unemployment, and dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models (DSGE models) and also cover demand shocks, macroeconomic effects of news (with or without nominal rigidities), investment with credit constraints, and liquidity with its aggregate effects.

ECON308: Econometrics : 2.5 credits

This course is to prepare students for basic empirical work in economics. In particular, topics will include basic data analysis, regression analysis, testing, and forecasting. Students will be provided with the opportunity to use actual economic data to test economic theories.

COMPUTER SOFTWARE

CSMT101: Analytic geometry 2.5 credits

Topics include the straight line, parabola, circle ellipse, hyperbola and polar coordinates. Translation of axes and second-degree equations are included.

CSSW406: ASP NET 2 credits

Server side web programming concepts to implement solutions for common web programming tasks. Includes Basic ASP.NET web controls, user management and authentication, state management, and development of database-driven web applications.

ENGL301: Business English 1 credit

The course focuses on level appropriate grammar, introduces vocabulary specific

to various business domains, and familiarizes students with the finer points of business etiquette and business correspondence.

CSSW103: C Programming 4 credits

Basic unified modeling language (UML) notation in object-oriented software design and development using the C# programming language in a .Net environment; focus on the program structure, syntax, constructs and keywords of the C# programming language, concepts of intermediate languages (ILs), the common language runtime (CLR), and .Net standard data types.

CSMT103: Computational mathematics 2.5 credits

This module involves the design and analysis of mathematical models for various problems and the construction of algorithms which efficiently and accurately compute solutions. The goal of the program is to offer depth in the area of concentration and breadth in the other mathematical sciences, with special emphasis on courses that will provide tools for innovative approaches to computer applications in industry.

CSHW202: Computer networking 3 credits

Data communications, network architectures, communication protocols, data link control, medium access control; introduction to local area networks metropolitan area networks and wide area networks; introduction to Internet and TCP/IP

CSHW201: Computer Organization and Systems Programming 3 credits

Introduction to organization of modern digital computers – understanding the various components of a computer and their interrelationships. Study of a specific architecture/machine with emphasis on systems programming in C and Assembly languages in a UNIX environment.

CSSW202: Data structure 3 credits

A study of advanced programming topics focused on logical structures of data, their physical representation, design and analysis  of algorithms operating on the structures, and techniques for program development and debugging. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate use and choice of standard data structures.

CSMT201: Discrete Mathematics 2.5 credits

Introduction to basic concepts of mathematics and mathematical reasoning. Logic, sets,

number theory, mathematical induction, direct and indirect formal proofs.

ENGL101: English 3 credits

The goal of this is to set standards for domains of English language learning: social interaction; access to information; presentation; and appreciation of literature and culture, and language. According to this curriculum, by the end, students should be able to: interact effectively in a variety of situations   ,obtain and make use of information from a variety of sources and media   ,present information in an organized manner   ,appreciate literature and other cultures and the nature of language.

ENGL102: English 2: 3 credits

This module is designed to improve and polish the communication skills through listening, speaking, reading and writing. Documentaries, online resources for grammar exercises, articles from major national and international newspapers.) will be used to encourage students’ engagement with contemporary media and write essays (personal, expository, argumentative) as well as develop excellent presentation skills.

CSSW101: Information systems and technology 3 credits

The module provides the necessary background to enable management information systems personnel to understand tradeoffs in information systems hardware, software, and architecture for effective use in the business environment. Topics covered include information technology planning and strategy, trends in computer hardware and systems software, telecommunications and network management, control and management of information resources, distributed and client-server technologies, and data representation and visualization.

CSSW301: Internet programming 1 3 credits

The evolution of the Internet and its technical foundation will be studied as well as basic techniques for presenting information on the World Wide Web. The client/server paradigm will be explored in detail featuring website design and construction using HTML, CGI, backend databases and Python.

CSPH101: General Physics 3 credits

This module provides the principles of mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and some topics from atomic and nuclear physics are presented. Calculus and vector analysis are used extensively. Intended for science majors.

CSMT102: Mathematical analysis 2.5 credits

These include mathematics of finance, probability and statistics, and Markov processes.

CSSW308: Mobile phone programming 3 credits

This module provides an overview of the most common programming environments for mobile phones and participants learn how to program on mobile devices. By small examples and hand-on sessions, participants will be able to create their own applications. The course will explain how to realize own projects on mobile phones and how to monetize those applications in different ways. Besides the general overview, focus will be on networking issues with mobile devices. Besides simple client/server examples, also peer to peer networks are discussed.

HIST 101: Mongolian history 0.5 credits

Mongol’s empire and lifestyle of ancient Mongolians and their culture.

CSSW201: Object- oriented programming 3 credits

Introduction to object-oriented programming techniques. Constructors, destructors, operator overloading. Inheritance and polymorphism. Elementary data structures including linked lists. Dynamic storage allocation concepts.

CSSW101: Principles of algorithm 2 credits

This module is about the design of efficient algorithms and proving that they meet the desired

specification. The course introduces basic principles and methods of algorithm design

and analysis and considers fundamental problems like sorting numbers and multiplying matrices.

ECON101: Principles of economics 2 credits

Microeconomics. Consumer behavior and demand, firm behavior and supply, price determination and market equilibrium under varying industry structure. Applications to labor and financial markets. 2006: Macroeconomics. Measuring aggregate economic activity, macroeconomic problems (such as unemployment and inflation), the monetary system, effects and limitations of monetary and fiscal policies.

MGMT201: Principles of management 2 credits

This module provides the student with a conceptual framework for understanding the basic  theories of management. Emphasis is placed on the internal and external environment, ethics, planning, goal setting, decision making, organizational structure, motivation and group dynamics, and effective control mechanisms.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE TRANSLATOR

CULT300 : Comparative cultural studies: 1.5 credits

Comparative Cultural Studies draws on social and aesthetic theory to understand how social identities, actions, and desires are produced and practiced in everyday life.

ECON104 : Principles of Economic : 2 credits

Topics covered include how markets work, including consumer behaviour, economic cost analysis and determination of prices; market structures and their impact on business behaviour, the relationships among labour, business, and government; business cycles; money creation and the banking system; economic stabilization policies, including deficit financing and taxation; international trade, and prospects for sustainable development. Alternative theoretical perspectives are introduced.

ENGL : Business English : 2 credits

Business English is a basic course designed for high-intermediate students of English as a second language who wish to improve their written and spoken business communication skills. The course focuses on level-appropriate grammar, introduces vocabulary specific to various business domains, and familiarizes students with the finer points of business  etiquette and business correspondence.

ENGL106: English Language Linguistics 1: 2 credits

Aims to provide a well-structured knowledge base for the systematic study of English Linguistics from current synchronic and diachronic perspectives.

ENGL106-2 : English Language Linguistics 2: 2 credits

Aims to provide a well-structured knowledge base for the systematic study of English Linguistics from current synchronic and diachronic perspectives.

ENGL107 : Speaking and Listening skills 1 : 2 credits

The goal of this class is to improve oral communication skills in basic academic situations. Students will learn useful vocabulary and grammar to function in these situations. At the end of the course, a successful student will be able to communicate basic information using correct vocabulary and grammar; answer questions, make statements, and ask questions about class topics; use new vocabulary and grammar to show understanding of listening and video passages about class topics.

ENGL107-2 : Speaking and Listening skills 2 : 2 credits

The goal of this class is to improve oral communication skills in basic academic situations. Students will learn useful vocabulary and grammar to function in these situations. At the end of the course, a successful student will be able to communicate basic information using correct vocabulary and grammar; answer questions, make statements, and ask questions about class topics; use new vocabulary and grammar to show understanding of listening and video passages about class topics.

ENGL109: Vocabulary 1 : 3 credits

Designed to help prepare students for reading in an academic environment. Students will read from a variety of sources: text book, newspapers, magazines, novels, and online sites. Students will also focus on new vocabulary from the readings and how the words are used. Students will also try to understand what each author’s main idea is and what is inferred. Students will often be asked to think and write critically about what is read and how it affects the world and the lives of others.

ENGL109-2 : Vocabulary 2: 1.5 credits

Designed to help prepare students for reading in an academic environment. Students will read from a variety of sources: text book, newspapers, magazines, novels, and online sites. Students will also focus on new vocabulary from the readings and how the words are used. Students will also try to understand what each author’s main idea is and what is inferred. Students will often be asked to think and write critically about what is read and how it affects the world and the lives of others.

ENGL110: English Reading and Writing 1 : 2 credits

This introductory  reading and writing course prepares students for the next level, intermediate to high intermediate and in some instances advanced reading and writing. This course focuses on improving students’ abilities in reading comprehension, building spelling and vocabulary skills, and writing well-formed simple, compound and complex sentences and well-organized paragraphs.

ENGL111 : TOEFL 1 : 1 credits

Designed to help students acquire the skills and confidence necessary to get a high score on the TOEFL test.

ENGL202 : Speaking and Listening skills 3 : 2 credits

The goal of this class is to improve oral communication skills in basic academic situations. Students will learn useful vocabulary and grammar to function in these situations. At the end of the course, a successful student will be able to communicate basic information using correct vocabulary and grammar; answer questions, make statements, and ask questions about class topics; use new vocabulary and grammar to show understanding of listening and video passages about class topics.

ENGL202-2 : Speaking and Listening skills 4 : 2 credits

The goal of this class is to improve oral communication skills in basic academic situations. Students will learn useful vocabulary and grammar to function in these situations. At the end of the course, a successful student will be able to communicate basic information using correct vocabulary and grammar; answer questions, make statements, and ask questions about class topics; use new vocabulary and grammar to show understanding of listening and video passages about class topics.

ENGL208 : English Reading and Writing 2 1 credits

This introductory  reading and writing course prepares students for the next level, intermediate to high intermediate and in some instances advanced reading and writing. This course focuses on improving students’ abilities in reading comprehension, building spelling and vocabulary skills, and writing well-formed simple, compound and complex sentences and well-organized paragraphs.

ENGL208-2: English Reading and Writing 3 : 1 credits

This introductory  reading and writing course prepares students for the next level, intermediate to high intermediate and in some instances advanced reading and writing. This course focuses on improving students’ abilities in reading comprehension, building spelling and vocabulary skills, and writing well-formed simple, compound and complex sentences and well-organized paragraphs.

ENGL300: English Linguistics 5 : 1 credits

An introduction to the major areas, problems, and techniques of modern linguisticsAims to provide a well-structured knowledge base for the systematic study of English Linguistics from current synchronic and diachronic perspectives.

1
ENGL301 : English Reading and Writing 4 : 1 credits

This introductory  reading and writing course prepares students for the next level, intermediate to high intermediate and in some instances advanced reading and writing. This course focuses on improving students’ abilities in reading comprehension, building spelling and vocabulary skills, and writing well-formed simple, compound and complex sentences and well-organized paragraphs

ENGL301-2 : English Reading and Writing 5 : 1 credits

This introductory  reading and writing course prepares students for the next level, intermediate to high intermediate and in some instances advanced reading and writing. This course focuses on improving students’ abilities in reading comprehension, building spelling and vocabulary skills, and writing well-formed simple, compound and complex sentences and well-organized paragraphs.

ENGL306 : Interpretation 1 : 1 credits

This course uses a process-oriented approach for applying the essential cognitive strategies to interpretation. These strategies include organizing and manipulating visual images, analyzing message for meaning, and self-monitoring for message accuracy.

ENGL402 : Local Studies : 1.5 credits

This course will develop skills for those interested in local and regional studies, integrating approaches used by archaeologists, folklorists, geographers and historians. A wide range of teaching methods are used including weekly lectures, workshops, tutorials.

LITE200 : American Literature 1 : 1 credits

This course is designed and devoted to an in-depth study of the American experience as captured in the seminal works of masters of American literature. The course focuses on historical as well as literary themes through reading, writing, listening/viewing, and speaking.  The analysis, interpretation and appreciation of the many aspects of American literature is emphasized throughout the course.

Hotel and Restaurant Management

COMP102 Information systems and technology 2.0 credit

This module covers the basic hardware of a personal computer, including installation, operations and interactions with software. Topics include component identification, memory-system, peripheral installation and configuration, preventive maintenance, hardware diagnostics/repair, installation and optimization of system software, commercial programs, system configuration, and device-drivers. Upon completion, students should be able to select appropriate computer equipment and software, upgrade/maintain existing equipment and software, and troubleshoot/repair non-functioning personal computers.

ECON104 Theory of Economics 2.0 credit

This is an introductory course in financial economics designed to give students first-time detailed exposure to the wide variety of financial instruments (assets and debt instruments) and the financial markets in which they are traded. In this course you learn about stocks, options, real estate, yield-bearing financial assets like bonds and notes, the money market, mutual funds, ETFs and ETNs, futures contracts, the markets in which these are traded, various statistics, indices, quotations and listings that pertain to these instruments, and theories about why these financial instruments perform as they do.

ENGL105-1 English 2.0 credit

English language classes are offered through programs that include English, English education, English literature and English for foreign language students. These courses cover beginning, intermediate and advanced levels of speaking, reading and writing in English, including grammar and literature skills. Continue reading for descriptions of common English language courses.

ENGL105-2 English 3.0 credit

English language classes are offered through programs that include English, English education, English literature and English for foreign language students. These courses cover beginning, intermediate and advanced levels of speaking, reading and writing in English, including grammar and literature skills. Continue reading for descriptions of common English language courses.

ENGL201-3 English 3.0 credit

English language classes are offered through programs that include English, English education, English literature and English for foreign language students. These courses cover beginning, intermediate and advanced levels of speaking, reading and writing in English, including grammar and literature skills. Continue reading for descriptions of common English language courses.

ENGL201-4 English 3.0 credits

English language classes are offered through programs that include English, English education, English literature and English for foreign language students. These courses cover beginning, intermediate and advanced levels of speaking, reading and writing in English, including grammar and literature skills. Continue reading for descriptions of common English language courses.

ETHN208 Ethnography 2.0 credit

This module is a practicum-style seminar in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, the course is a mix of reading anthropological and science studies ethnographies; and formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites.

HIST101-1 Mongolian history 2.5 credit

The module provides an introduction to basic concepts of human geography within the discussion of people, places and physical landscapes. The purpose of the course is to improve students’ understanding of the Mongolian, and to develop skills of critical thinking and cross-cultural understanding, by examining the processes that link places together, and how these linkages affect places and people. Understanding such processes is crucial if we are to understand how events I one part of the world have effects in other parts of the world, and how these effects play out on the landscape and how they affect people’s personal lives.

HIST107 Natural Geography of Mongolia 2.5 credit

The module provides an introduction to tourism geography concepts, importance of tourism geography, interpretation and analysis of phenomena, characteristics of geography, human being activities within the tourist sites, geographical location of Mongolia and forms, earth`s surface and its role in the tourism industry in Mongolia, nature tourism site.

HIST204 History of World Civilization 2.5 credit

This module introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioural sciences.

KORE202 Korean Language 4.0 credit

This module teaches the Korean Hangul by applying the natural approach in the classroom. The materials are designed to encourage the students to feel free to interact in Korean as naturally and as spontaneously as possible. It introduces vocabulary skills, decoding skills, and fundamental sentence structures in the present and past. Pronunciation, grammar, and everyday vocabulary are stressed as indispensable tools for comprehension and expression. Aspects of Korean culture and history are covered as well.

KORE301 Korean Language 2.0 credit

This module teaches the Korean Hangul by applying the natural approach in the classroom. The materials are designed to encourage the students to feel free to interact in Korean as naturally and as spontaneously as possible. It introduces vocabulary skills, decoding skills, and fundamental sentence structures in the present and past. Pronunciation, grammar, and everyday vocabulary are stressed as indispensable tools for comprehension and expression. Aspects of Korean culture and history are covered as well.

MGMT 115 Principles of Management 2.5 credit

The emphasis of the course will be on the skills and knowledge needed to successfully manage an organization. This course is especially useful for those newly promoted to supervisory and managerial positions within the private, public, or federal sector. Prior to the first class, participants will receive a syllabus listing the required textbooks and delineating the required readings and case studies.

MGMT117 Hotel Management 2.5 credit

This module will introduce you to all the aspects of hotel management from food and beverage to front office and sales. The course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to find a top position in this wonderful industry and develop your self confidence and management skills.

MGMT212 Ecotourism management 2.0 credit

This module acknowledges the rapidly developing phenomenon of ecotourism, and the contribution of tourism and recreation professionals. It addresses the definition, development, markets, Management, Characteristics and clients of ecotourism. Assessment includes an industry product presentation, evaluation report, and a final examination.

MGMT313 Hotel Business Management 2.5 credit

This course provides an overview of the lodging management industry. The student will have the opportunity to explore hospitality careers, food service, restaurant organization, hotels and hotel organization, meeting industry, management and leadership, human resources, marketing and selling, marketing communications, management companies, and ethics in hospitality management

MRKT 203 Principles of Marketing 2.0 credit

This module examines the business function of Marketing. Students will learn how marketers deliver value in satisfying customer needs and wants, determine which target markets the organization can best serve, and decide upon appropriate products, services, and programs to serve these markets. Topics include branding and product development, pricing strategies, marketing research, promotion, supply chain management and service marketing. Marketing metrics will be used throughout the course to assess the impact of marketing strategies

SPRT111 Physical Education 1 Credit

This module introduces concepts for personal development in health-related fitness and physical skills; these include cardiovascular exercise, body composition, strength, endurance, and flexibility which will be the basis for the four-year physical education program.  Students will develop physical and health-related fitness skills through participation in individual and field activities.  All freshmen will enroll in this course.

INTERNATIONAL LAW

CILA 200: Civil law

An in-depth study of the basic principles of jurisdiction and the procedure to be observed in the conduct of civil cases. It also includes a study of the jurisdiction of various courts of different levels and administrative or quasi-judicial agencies.

CILA 223: Labor law and social security

This course provides Fundamental theories and knowledge in modern management, economics, social security and risk management,Good acquaintance with the regulatory policies ,Competence in social security, risk management and insurance management

CILA 300 : Civil procedure

Civil Procedure concerns the rules and principles that govern the litigation of a civil case. The course addresses systemic issues related to how and where a lawsuit is filed, including: personal and subject matter jurisdiction; venue; the notice required once a lawsuit has been filed; and which substantive law-state or federal-should apply in federal court. The course also familiarizes the student with the stages of a lawsuit, including: pleading; structuring the lawsuit; discovery; termination of a lawsuit without trial; trial; and actions that may be taken after a jury verdict or bench trial.

CILA 302:International business law

This course examines the present legal structure and operation of the world trade system, primarily through analysis of multilateral and regional trade treaties and associated law.

 

CILA 402:Contract:

Contracts is concerned with the formation of contracts. The traditional offer and acceptance are analyzed in light of problems presented by modern bargaining techniques. Voidability of contracts formed by fraud, mistake, illegality, and unconscionable advantage is also stressed.

CILA 406 : International Arbitration

 The course will review the law and practice of international commercial arbitration as one of the key approaches to international alternative dispute resolution.

CILA 407: Property law

The introductory course in real property law, concerning possession, estates in land and future interests, concurrent ownership, landlord-tenant relationships, conveyancing and title, and servitudes

CILA311: International private law:

This module deals with the concepts, history, sources, theories and general processes of international private law. Particular areas studied will include jurisdiction; family law; obligations; commercial law and property law.

CRLA 202: Criminal law

This course deals with what is called substantive criminal law, i.e., crimes. Numerous crimes such as homicide, theft, and conspiracy are examined, and defenses such as self-defense and insanity are scrutinized. A primary focus of the course is the utilization and interpretation of criminal statutes.

CRLA 301: Criminal procedure

Criminal Procedure explores part of the interface between the criminal justice system and the United States Constitution. It introduces students to constitutional analysis by examining key provisions of the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments as they apply to police investigation and interrogation as well as to the circumstances under which indigent defendants are guaranteed the assistance of counsel.

CRLA 303: Criminology

An overview of the principle theories of criminality and the application of these theories to contemporary crime issues

ECON 104: Principles of economics : 2.5 credits

Microeconomics. Consumer behavior and demand, firm behavior and supply, price determination and market equilibrium under varying industry structure. Applications to labor and financial markets. 2006: Macroeconomics. Measuring aggregate economic activity, macroeconomic problems (such as unemployment and inflation), the monetary system, effects and limitations of monetary and fiscal policies.

CRLA 321: International criminal law

This module will concern the scope of international criminal law, the definition of international crimes, principles of jurisdiction, procedures for international criminal prosecutions, and examples of international criminal law.

INOP 221: International and regional organizations

This course explores the institutional structures, political processes, and impact of international organizations within the larger context of world politics.  International organizations, both governmental and nongovernmental, play an increasingly prominent role in efforts to resolve a wide range of global problems and are important elements in the current system of global governance.  While the course will cover the traditional problems—international security, the global distribution of wealth, and threats to social welfare—particular attention will be given to international environmental problems.

JRIS 10: Legal theory

This course discusses a number of basic notions associated with contemporary legal philosophy, including the nature of legal analysis, the separation of law from other areas of social life, the character of legal positivism, the role of the legal decision-maker, legal practice as an interpretive activity, the character of moral judgment, the difference in moral theory between the right and the good, liberalism as a political theory and its opponents, and liberalism’s attitude to rights and to cultural difference.

JRIS 108: Legal ethics:

The course explores ethical issues that arise in professional practice, and the regulations and standards that govern them. Importantly, it considers these issues and principles in their wider and dynamic contexts. These contexts include the history and workings of the legal profession and its rapidly changing political, social and economic circumstances

JRIS 114: Roman law

The significance of Roman law as an enduring legacy from the ancient world to the modern; a study of the sources and historical development of Roman law; and a study of selected aspects of Roman law including the law of actions (procedure), the law of obligations (contract and delict), family and succession law, and criminal law.

JRIS 117: History of Mongolian foreign policy and diplomacy

The course revisits the theory and practice of Mongolian foreign policy and diplomacy in an increasingly interdependent world. The course aims at understanding how foreign policy is made and what modern diplomacy is about. Attention will be paid to Foreign Policy Analysis and Diplomatic Studies, which use theoretical perspectives like realism, liberalism and social constructivism, as well as historical perspectives. The evolution of diplomacy as an institution will be discussed with specific attention for recent trends and innovations.

JRIS 312: Comparative law:

At the beginning of the course, we will consider various methodological and theoretical approaches to comparative law in general, which also take into account some of the other major legal traditions – most of which are covered individually. Then, we will turn to studying the history, culture, distribution, court systems, legal education and professions, sources of law, and procedural law of the civil law tradition.

PALW205: Customs law

This course provides an explation of the laws and regulations. Instruction time parallels the historic emphasis areas- classification and valuation, while highlighting all pertinent customs law matters

PHIL103: Philosophy: 1.5 credits

An introduction to philosophy through topics found in classical philosophical writings, such as the nature of truth and knowledge, mind and body, freedom and determinism, right and wrong, and the existence of God.

PLAW 116: Constitutional law

This module focuses on the issues and consideration will be given to judicial processes in constitutional cases; judicial review; and the federal courts functioning in the constitutional system. Attention will then be given to the relationships of the three federal branches of government, with emphasis on some of the powers and limitations of the executive, legislative and judicial bodies that arise from principles of separation of powers and national checks and balances.

PLAW 201 : Administrative Law

This course is an introduction to the legal principles that undergird the administrative state. We will study the sources of law for agency action and examine the ways in which the practical necessities of having an unelected, expert bureaucracy are squared with our commitments to a government that is democratically accountable and legitimate.

Financial law

The course aims to examine and critically discuss the fundamental concepts of financial law in the light of market developments in national and international financial markets.

PLAW314: Taxation law: 2 credits

This module will offer an introduction to the principal law considerations raised when creating a tax system. Topics will include the merits of different tax systems (such as income and consumption taxes), questions of tax administration and legal complexity, the efficiency implications of taxation, and distributional implications. It will consider how well current legislation addresses these various issues and consider whether there are ways that they might be better addressed.

INTERNATIONAL TRADE and ECONOMICS

IRRT405: International Trade: 2.5 credits

The main theories of international trade in goods and services, and of international movements of capital and labour. Partial equilibrium and general equilibrium analysis of the major instruments of trade policy, their economic effects, and the issues created by their use in practice. The economics of regional trading arrangements, such as free trade

JAPL100: Japanese language 1 : 3 credits

The course will use a range of exercises and activities to develop speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, including various types of self-paced exercises available on CECIL. The course will introduce some socio-cultural aspects directly related to language-use situations.

JAPL100: Japanese language 2: 3 credits

This Japanese language course is designed for those who have some basic knowledge in understanding Japanese, speaking Japanese, reading Japanese and writing in the Japanese language.

JRIS 117: History of Mongolian foreign policy and diplomacy: 2 credits

The module  revisits the theory and practice of Mongolian foreign policy and diplomacy in an increasingly interdependent world. The course aims at understanding how foreign policy is made and what modern diplomacy is about. Attention will be paid to Foreign Policy Analysis and Diplomatic Studies, which use theoretical perspectives like realism, liberalism and social constructivism, as well as historical perspectives. The evolution of diplomacy as an institution will be discussed with specific attention for recent trends and innovations.

MATH 116: Calculus: 2 credits

Intensive course in intermediate algebra and trigonometry. Topics include algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric functions and their graphs.

MGMT 115: Principles of management: 2 credits

This module  provides the student with a conceptual framework for understanding the basic  theories of management. Emphasis is placed on the internal and external environment, ethics, planning, goal setting, decision making, organizational structure, motivation and group dynamics, and effective control mechanisms.

MGMT 115: Principles of management: 2 credits

This module provides the student with a conceptual framework for understanding the basic  theories of management. Emphasis is placed on the internal and external environment, ethics, planning, goal setting, decision making, organizational structure, motivation and group dynamics, and effective control mechanisms.

MGMT117: Business Ethics: 2 credits

This module introduces contemporary and controversial ethical issues facing the business community. Topics include moral reasoning, moral dilemmas, law and morality, equity, justice and fairness, ethical standards, and moral development. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of their moral responsibilities and obligations as members of the workforce and society.

MGMT301: Investment and project management: 2 credits

This course Investigates the concepts, theories and techniques underlying the development of investment and project policies and strategies.

MGMT313: Financial management: 2 credits

Designed to develop the financial skills and logical thought processes necessary to understand and discuss financial policy decisions in a global economy. Specific objectives include developing an understanding of the time value of money; using financial statements in decision making; and understanding the nature of financial markets, the cost of capital, valuation of stocks and bonds, management of short-term assets, short-term and long-term financing, capital markets, and multinational financial management. Addresses the impact of legal, social, technological, and ethical considerations on efficient economic outcomes. Requires a financial calculator and provides an opportunity to develop computer spreadsheet skills.

MRKT 203; Principles of marketing : 2 credits

This module introduces principles and problems of marketing goods and services. Topics include promotion, placement, and pricing strategies for products. Upon completion, students should be able to apply marketing principles in organizational decision-making.

MRKT 219: International trade theory: 2.5 credits

The module explores the theory and practice of international trade theory from classical, neoclassical and alternative perspectives. Topics include the determination of trade, the winners and losers in trade, and the role of government and other international institutions in regulating trade.

MRKT304: International marketing: 2.5 credits

This module is designed to provide the student with an overview of international marketing. The course deals with all aspects of marketing from an international perspective and prepares students to deal with foreign competitive situations and international opportunities. It also includes material on e-commerce and internet marketing.

MRKT320: International trade agreement: 2 credits

This module examines the present legal structure and operation of the world trade system, primarily through analysis of multilateral and regional trade treaties and associated law. Much of the course focuses on the World Trade Organization, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, and other agreements concluded in the Uruguay Round of trade negotiations.

MRKT409: International trade and logistics: 1.5 credits

This module provides Global logistics and supply chain management; International transport systems; Maritime and trade law; International trade, transport and logistics; Research methods; Operational research and information technology

PLAW308: Law of Banking : 2 credit

The Law of Banking provides an introduction to relevant legal principles and to aspects of the practice of banking. The course is concerned directly with the relationship between banker and customer and with contemporary transactional techniques.This course will address bills of exchange, as a foundational financial instrument, but not cheques which are declining in importance. It also addresses contemporary banking instruments and transactions, such as bonds, syndicated lending, derivatives, and asset securitisation.

SMAR 208: Securities market: 2 credits

The valuation of equity shares and fixed interest investments: theories of the term structure of interest rates; the behaviour of stock market prices and the principles involved in constructing portfolios.

STAT 202: Statistical theory: 2 credits

Distribution theory for statistics of normal samples; exponential statistical models; sufficiency principle; least squares, maximum likelihood, and hypothesis testing, likelihood ratio procedures; the general linear model, the Gauss-Markov theorem, multiple comparisons; contingency tables, chi-square methods, goodness-of-fit; nonparametric and robust methods; decision theory.

STAT410: Statistics: 1.5 credits

This module contain the following topics: a first look at statistics; descriptive graphs; descriptive measures; probability concepts; discrete probability distributions; statistical inference and sampling; hypotheses testing for the mean and variance of a population; inference procedures for two populations; estimation and testing for population proportions; analysis of variance; quality control; applications of the Chi-square statistic; correlation and simple linear regression; multiple linear regression; time series analysis and index number.

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TOURISM MANAGEMENT

ACCO402 Principal of accounting 2.5 credit

This module introduces business decision making accounting information systems. Emphasis is on analyzing, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare financial statements, understand the role of financial information in decision-making and address ethical considerations.

COMP102: Information technology and systems 2.0 credit

This module covers the basic hardware of a personal computer, including installation, operations and interactions with software. Topics include component identification, memory-system, peripheral installation and configuration, preventive maintenance, hardware diagnostics/repair, installation and optimization of system software, commercial programs, system configuration, and device-drivers. Upon completion, students should be able to select appropriate computer equipment and software, upgrade/maintain existing equipment and software, and troubleshoot/repair non-functioning personal computers.

ECOL112 Ecology 2.5 credit

This module will review major ecological concepts, identify the techniques used by ecologists, provide an overview of local and global environmental issues, and examine individual, group and governmental activities important for protecting natural ecosystems.  The course has been designed to provide technical information, to direct the student toward pertinent literature,to identify problems and issues, to utilize research methodology for the study of natural ecosystems, and to consider appropriate solutions and analytical techniques.  Discussion and understanding will be emphasized

ECON104 Economics 2.0 Credits

Introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money.

ENGL105-1 English 2.0 Credits

This modules prepares students for the advanced reading, writing, and research tasks. The course provides a review of high school-level concepts and introduction to university-level writing, reading, information literacy, and critical thinking skills. Features written assignments designed to develop the student’s ability to write clearly and correctly, to think critically, and to carry out basic library research. Includes lecture, class discussion, group work, and extensive reading and writing. Small class with instructor.

ENGL105-2 English 2.0 Credits

This module prepares students for the advanced reading, writing, and research tasks.The course provides a review of high school-level concepts and introduction to university-level writing, reading, information literacy, and critical thinking skills. Features written assignments designed to develop the student’s ability to write clearly and correctly, to think critically, and to carry out basic library research. Includes lecture, class discussion, group work, and extensive reading and writing.

ENGL201-3 English 3.0 credit

This module prepares students for the advanced reading, writing, and research tasks. The course provides a review of high school-level concepts and introduction to university-level writing, reading, information literacy, and critical thinking skills. Features written assignments designed to develop the student’s ability to write clearly and correctly, to think critically, and to carry out basic library research. Includes lecture, class discussion, group work, and extensive reading and writing.

GEOL215 The world studies 2.5 credit

World Studies incorporates history and literature, it helps students make connections between the disciplines and aids their understanding of key concepts within each discipline. Literature offers examples of historical themes in action, while history provides contextual background for the particular pieces of literature.

 

HIST107 Mongolian Geography 2.5 credit

The module provides an introduction to basic concepts of human geography within the discussion of people, places and physical landscapes. The purpose of the course is to improve students’ understanding of the Mongolian, and to develop skills of critical thinking and cross-cultural understanding, by examining the processes that link places together, and how these linkages affect places and people. Understanding such processes is crucial if we are to understand how events in one part of the world have effects in other parts of the world, and how these effects play out on the landscape and how they affect people’s personal lives.

 

HIST204 History of World civilization 2.5 credit

A survey of the birth and diffusion of world civilizations from “pre-history”to 1500, with attention to major cultural, social, economic, and political trends within each civilization. The emergence of European civilization is set within a larger framework of civilizations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, and interactions between or among civilizations are stressed.

KORE301 Korean Language 2.0 credit

This module teaches the Korean Hangul by applying the natural approach in the classroom. The materials are designed to encourage the students to feel free to interact in Korean as naturally and as spontaneously as possible. It introduces vocabulary skills, decoding skills, and fundamental sentence structures in the present and past. Pronunciation, grammar, and everyday vocabulary are stressed as indispensable tools for comprehension and expression. Aspects of Korean culture and history are covered as well.

KORE302 Korean Language 4.0 Credit

This module teaches the Korean Hangul by applying the natural approach in the classroom. The materials are designed to encourage the students to feel free to interact in Korean as naturally and as spontaneously as possible. It introduces vocabulary skills, decoding skills, and fundamental sentence structures in the present and past. Pronunciation, grammar, and everyday vocabulary are stressed as indispensable tools for comprehension and expression. Aspects of Korean culture and history are covered as well

MGMT 115 Principles of Management 2.5 credit

Principles of Management, provides the student with a conceptual framework for understanding the basic theories of management. Emphasis is placed on the internal and external environment, ethics, planning, goal setting, decision making, organizational structure, motivation and group dynamics, and effective control mechanisms.

MGMT303 Business management of tour organizations 2.5 credit

It is as a business management course with a specialization in tourism and travel management studies as well as extensive foreign language and inter-cultural content, which make up about a sixth of the curriculum.

MGMT304 Management of tourists destination 2.5 credit

The aims of this class is to provide students with an understanding of the processes involved in tourism destination development; a theoretical framework of destination management and planning issues and strategic approaches; planning and marketing applications for destination management On completion of this module, the student will be able to :identify and critically appraise the main components of a destination development plan; critically appraise the principles and practice of destination marketing and distribution and their application to the strategic management of a destination; critically assess the main methods of monitoring the performance of a destination; synthesize good practice in destination.

MGMT307 international tourism services management 2.5 credit

This module  is ideal if you wish to develop and succeed as a professional travel and tourism manager. Tourism is currently one of the world’s fastest growing industries and the course will equip you with a range of transferable skills, which can be used to meet the ever changing demands of this dynamic business. This module focuses on employability, and you can take advantage of a paid internship on the sandwich route, which can provide opportunities to work in a supervisory capacity within the travel and tourism sector throughout the world.

MGMT308 Hotel and restaurant management 3.0 credit

the opportunity to explore hospitality careers, food service, restaurant organization, hotels and hotel organization, meeting industry, management and leadership, human resources, marketing and selling, marketing communications, management companies, and ethics in hospitality management.

MGMT401 Human resource management 2.5 credit

Human-resources management is viewed as an integral part of the basic management process and the orientation of the course is toward developing managerial skills useful in establishing organizational personnel policy. Specific topics include the role of human resources in the management process, human-resources planning and forecasting, job information systems, recruitment and selection, human-resources development, compensation, legal framework, and evaluation.

MRKT 203 Principles of Marketing 2.0 Credit

This module examines the business function of Marketing. Students will learn how marketers deliver value in satisfying customer needs and wants, determine which target markets the organization can best serve, and decide upon appropriate products, services, and programs to serve these markets. Topics include branding and product development, pricing strategies, marketing research, promotion, supply chain management and service marketing. Marketing metrics will be used throughout the course to assess the impact of marketing strategies.

MRKT309 Tourism marketing 2.5 credit

Learn about the fundamental role of marketing management and the importance of being customer oriented in hospitality and tourism. This module introduces students to external marketing environments; helps understand the role of consumer behavior in hospitality and tourism; identifies and explains strategies for developing and promoting service “products” and various distribution channels; highlights the latest trends in destination marketing, e-marketing, international marketing, as related to hospitality and tourism.

MRKT404 international trade and freight forwarding 1.5 credit

The module aims to equip participants with key skills and knowledge required to perform effectively in a freight forwarding and trade environment.

PSYC114 Psychology of Communication 2.0 credit

Understand the processes of perception, cognition, motivation, emotion, learning, memory and creativity in combination with social roles, group affiliations and cultural backgrounds. Explore how people communicate to themselves, to other individuals, within small groups, within large organizations, with mass communication and in cross-cultural communications.

TOUR113 Principles of Tourism 2.5 credit

The aim of the module is to provide a theoretical framework of the fundamental aspects of tourism. Key terms and concepts of tourism are evaluated. A comprehensive introduction is provided to the world’s most rapidly growing industry. The course examines how different components of the industry work together to create a unified, successful travel experience. Travel and tourism industry is presented from a global perspective, offering insights into the economic, political, and social forces that drive and shape tourism.

TOUR206 Theory of tour guiding 2.5 credit

This module is designed to prepare students to become professional tour guides. Emphasis is placed on tour conducting, tour preparation and reporting, tour routines and itineraries, public speaking, guiding principles, managing group behavior, customer service, cultural diversity and knowledge of Mongolian  History. Homeland security issues as well as the cultural diversity of Ulaanbaatar and country areas are included.

TOUR306 Paleontology 2.0 credit

Paleontology is the study of fossils. Fossils are certainly one of the more interesting parts of a museum tour, but much more importantly, they represent extremely valuable tools that can be used to subdivide geologic time, recognize ancient environments and climates, reconstruct the motions of tectonic plates, determine the nature and tempo of organic evolution, and a host of other things. This course will attempt to integrate lectures, labs, and fieldwork on fossils. The lecture component of the course will emphasize the significant contributions of paleontology, as well as providing information necessary to understand the lab component.

TOUR311 Domestic tourism 2.5 credit

Cultural Lag, Destination Tourism, Diffusion of Innovation, Domestic Tourism, Domestic Traveller, Excursionist, Hotel Bed-Nights, Inbound Tourism, Internal Tourism, Leisure, Migration, National Tourism, Outbound Tourism, Region, Social Change, Social Mobility, Social Overhead Capital (SOC) as opposed to Directly Productive Activities (DPA), Tourism Infrastructure, Tourist Profile Statistics, Tourism “Suprastructure”, Visitor and Visitor Days.

Tourism-Foreign language

ACCO402 Principles of Accounting 2.5 credit

The module  begins with the definition of accounting, types of accounting, and the basic concepts of accounting and covers basic financial accounting topics such as accounting cycle, journal entries, posting, adjusting entries, trial balance, preparation of financial statements, closing and opening entries, accounting of value added tax, payroll accounting, and accounting of current assets

ACCO402Principles of Accounting 2.5credits

The module begins with the definition of accounting, types of accounting, and the basic concepts of accounting and covers basic financial accounting topics such as accounting cycle, journal entries, posting, adjusting entries, trial balance, preparation of financial statements, closing and opening entries, accounting of value added tax, payroll accounting, and accounting of current assets.

CILA310 Business law of tourism and hospitality service 2.5 credit

This course is the study of laws and rules in tourism and hospitality industry.

COMP102Information systems and technology 2.0 credit

This module covers the basic hardware of a personal computer, including installation, operations and interactions with software. Topics include component identification, memory-system, peripheral installation and configuration, preventive maintenance, hardware diagnostics/repair, installation and optimization of system software, commercial programs, system configuration, and device-drivers. Upon completion, students should be able to select appropriate computer equipment and software, upgrade/maintain existing equipment and software, and troubleshoot/repair non-functioning personal computers.

ECOL112Ecology 2.5credits

This module will review major ecological concepts, identify the techniques used by ecologists, provide an overview of local and global environmental issues, and examine individual, group and governmental activities important for protecting natural ecosystems.  The course has been designed to provide technical information, to direct the student toward pertinent literature,to identify problems and issues, to utilize research methodology for the study of natural ecosystems, and to consider appropriate solutions and analytical techniques.  Discussion and understanding will be emphasized.

ECON104Theory of Economics 2.0 credit

This is an introductory course in financial economics designed to give students first-time detailed exposure to the wide variety of financial instruments (assets and debt instruments) and the financial markets in which they are traded. In this course you learn about stocks, options, real estate, yield-bearing financial assets like bonds and notes, the money market, mutual funds, ETFs and ETNs, futures contracts, the markets in which these are traded, various statistics, indices, quotations and listings that pertain to these instruments, and theories about why these financial instruments perform as they do.

 

ENGL105-1English 2.0 credit

English language classes are offered through programs that include English, English education, English literature and English for foreign language students. These courses cover beginning, intermediate and advanced levels of speaking, reading and writing in English, including grammar and literature skills. Continue reading for descriptions of common English language courses

ENGL105-2English 3.0 credits

English language classes are offered through programs that include English, English education, English literature and English for foreign language students. These courses cover beginning, intermediate and advanced levels of speaking, reading and writing in English, including grammar and literature skills. Continue reading for descriptions of common English language courses.

ENGL300 English Language 2.0 credit

English language classes are offered through programs that include English, English education, English literature and English for foreign language students. These courses cover beginning, intermediate and advanced levels of speaking, reading and writing in English, including grammar and literature skills. Continue reading for descriptions of common English language courses

ENGL301 English for hotel 2.0 credit

English language classes are offered through programs that include English, English education, English literature and English for foreign language students. These courses cover beginning, intermediate and advanced levels of speaking, reading and writing in English, including grammar and literature skills. Continue reading for descriptions of common English language courses.

GEOL215World studies 3.5 credits

World Studies incorporates history and literature, it helps students make connections between the disciplines and aids their understanding of key concepts within each discipline. Literature offers examples of historical themes in action, while history provides contextual background for the particular pieces of literature. World Studies students will earn two credits in English and two credits in World History. Along the way, students will improve their reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. The large class size (roughly twice the size of a conventional class) can be a challenge for some young people who struggle with staying focused. This challenge is mitigated by the presence of two instructors and the richness of the overlapping curriculum

HIST101-1: Mongolian history 2.5 credit

The module provides an introduction to basic concepts of human geography within the discussion of people, places and physical landscapes. The purpose of the course is to improve students’ understanding of the Mongolian, and to develop skills of critical thinking and cross-cultural understanding, by examining the processes that link places together, and how these linkages affect places and people. Understanding such processes is crucial if we are to understand how events in one part of the world have effects in other parts of the world, and how these effects play out on the landscape and how they affect people’s personal lives.

HIST204History of World Civilization 2.5 credits

This module introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences.

KORE202Korean Language 2.0credits

This module teaches the Korean Hangul by applying the natural approach in the classroom. The materials are designed to encourage the students to feel free to interact in Korean as naturally and as spontaneously as possible. It introduces vocabulary skills, decoding skills, and fundamental sentence structures in the present and past. Pronunciation, grammar, and everyday vocabulary are stressed as indispensable tools for comprehension and expression. Aspects of Korean culture and history are covered as well.

KORE401 Korean Language 2.0 credit

This module teaches the Korean Hangul by applying the natural approach in the classroom. The materials are designed to encourage the students to feel free to interact in Korean as naturally and as spontaneously as possible. It introduces vocabulary skills, decoding skills, and fundamental sentence structures in the present and past. Pronunciation, grammar, and everyday vocabulary are stressed as indispensable tools for comprehension and expression. Aspects of Korean culture and history are covered as well.

LANG411 Foreign Language 2.0 credit

This module will provide instruction in academic and professional language skills for non-native speakers of English. Emphasis is placed on development of integrated language skills for use in studying a particular content area. Upon completion, students will demonstrate improved academic language, content-specific vocabulary and skills, and cultural knowledge in the topic area.

LING127 Korean Language 4.0 credits

This module teaches the Korean Hangul by applying the natural approach in the classroom. The materials are designed to encourage the students to feel free to interact in Korean as naturally and as spontaneously as possible. It introduces vocabulary skills, decoding skills, and fundamental sentence structures in the present and past. Pronunciation, grammar, and everyday vocabulary are stressed as indispensable tools for comprehension and expression. Aspects of Korean culture and history are covered as well.

MGMT 115Principles of Management 2.5credits

The emphasis of the course will be on the skills and knowledge needed to successfully manage an organization. This course is especially useful for those newly promoted to supervisory and managerial positions within the private, public, or federal sector. Prior to the first class, participants will receive a syllabus listing the required textbooks and delineating the required readings and case studies.

MGMT118 Front office service 2.0 credit

Hotels depend on guest service agents to provide courteous and professional service to guests who are checking into or out of the facility, and to offer assistance to guests as needed during their stay. On-the-job training and previous customer service experience are the most important qualities for most employers.

MGMT212Ecotourism management 2.0 credits

This module acknowledges the rapidly developing phenomenon of ecotourism, and the contribution of tourism and recreation professionals. It addresses the definition, development, markets, Management, Characteristics and clients of ecotourism. Assessment includes an industry product presentation, evaluation report, and a final examination.

MGMT303 Business management of tour organizations 2.5credits

It is now positioned as a business management course with a specialization in tourism and travel management studies as well as extensive foreign language and inter-cultural content, which make up about a sixth of the curriculum.